Girl born with disabilities due to birth injuries awarded £3.5m compensation

A girl who was born to face a lifetime of severe disability at a Sheffield hospital will receive £3.5m in compensation from the NHS. Born about eight weeks prematurely, she suffered a brain haemorrhage. Now 10 years old, she has hydrocephalus, developmental delays and partial left-sided paralysis due to the birth injury.

The court heard that medics failed to advise her mother of alternatives before proceeding to a premature delivery. Deputy High Court judge David Pittaway QC said the girl’s vision was impaired and she would need lifelong care and support. Had the mother’s pregnancy been allowed to continue for another two weeks, her daughter would have been born uninjured.

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust agreed to settle the girl’s claim for a lump sum of £3.5m.

Jenna Kisala, Medical Negligence Solicitor at Howells Solicitors, says “Fortunately this type of case is uncommon, however we do deal with such cases which are very difficult for parents and their families.  They can benefit from the  support of Solicitors who are understanding of their individual circumstances and well skilled to deal with their case.  This little girl will now be receiving compensation which will enable her rebuild her life. The compensation will allow her to be cared for and looked after for the rest of her life in the way that she deserves.

Any family who have unfortunately suffered a similar experience can contact us for a free and compassionate chat regarding their situation.”

To discuss your specific situation with our Medical Negligence team you can call our enquiry team and make a free telephone appointment.

You can email Howells to make an appointment at [email protected], visit our website or call us:

Sheffield0114 249 66 66

Barnsley: 0122 680 51 90

Rotherham0170 936 40 00

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The full BBC story is here.

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